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Owen Wilson appears in a scene from the 2010 movie Little Fockers. - Provided courtesy of DW Films / Universal Pictures

Owen Wilson is not dead, joins Aretha Franklin and more as target of hoaxes

12/30/2010 by Corinne Heller

Owen Wilson is not dead but is the latest celebrity to have fallen victim to a recent series of online death hoaxes that also targeted singer Aretha Franklin and actors such as Eddie Murphy, Charlie Sheen and Adam Sandler.

The hoaxes were circulated mostly on social media networks such as Twitter.

"When I heard on the news that I had died the other day, I quickly ran to my PC and checked the ratings for my show," Sheen told the TV show "The Insider." "Hmmm ... that's odd, all the numbers appeared solid. Perhaps even up a bit. You can only imagine my relief when I discovered shortly afterward that they were referring to my actual literal death. That I can survive. I then quickly called my Mom."

Wilson, who currently stars in the movies "Little Fockers" and "How Do You Know," and the other actors have not commented.

Franklin is currently recovering from the mysterious surgery she underwent earlier this month. Rumors that said the 68-year-old "Queen of Soul" allegedly passed away had surfaced on Monday, following news of the death of Teena Marie, an R&B singer often dubbed the "Ivory Queen of Soul," who was recently found dead at age 54.

In November, the singer canceled all concert dates and personal appearances through May 2011 by order of her doctors. She has not specified the nature of her illness or of her December 2 surgery, which was deemed successful, and has not commented on recent reports that say she has pancreatic cancer.

Her cousin told the Detroit Free Press earlier this month that Franklin will perform again in 2011 and was "doing better than doctors expected".

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